ABELES-ABELIA

May 27
senchainc:

This week we were excited to announce the release of Sencha Animator.
Sencha Animator is a desktop application for Mac, Windows, and Linux that allows you to create CSS3 Animations for WebKit browsers with ease. With Animator you drag and drop assets onto the stage, then start manipulating how their CSS properties change over time. Animator has full scene support, and you can even attach JavaScript handlers to objects on the stage to jump between scenes.
Be sure to check out the demos to see what has already been created with Sencha Animator, such as this amazing KickFu iPhone game, or the Museum of Science interactive ad.
You can try it out free for 30-days, so give it a go! Download Sencha Animator and see how easy it is to create something amazing today.

senchainc:

This week we were excited to announce the release of Sencha Animator.

Sencha Animator is a desktop application for Mac, Windows, and Linux that allows you to create CSS3 Animations for WebKit browsers with ease. With Animator you drag and drop assets onto the stage, then start manipulating how their CSS properties change over time. Animator has full scene support, and you can even attach JavaScript handlers to objects on the stage to jump between scenes.

Be sure to check out the demos to see what has already been created with Sencha Animator, such as this amazing KickFu iPhone game, or the Museum of Science interactive ad.

You can try it out free for 30-days, so give it a go! Download Sencha Animator and see how easy it is to create something amazing today.

May 27

This Much I Know: YOU DON'T SAY: WORDS "FACEBOOK" AND "TWITTER" ARE BANNED FROM FRENCH AIRWAVES →

matthewfraser-thismuchiknow:

The French are notorious for their obsession with maddening, micro-meddling rules and regulations.

Anglo-Saxons who live in France, as I do, constantly struggle with the puzzling paradox in a society universally admired for its splendid “joie de vivre” — yet infamous for its oppressive…

May 27
elle:

Street Chic Daily 
Photo: Adam Katz Sinding/Le 21Éme Arrondissement

elle:

Street Chic Daily 

Photo: Adam Katz Sinding/Le 21Éme Arrondissement

May 27
photojojo:

Photojojo founder, Amit, has found a 10/10 bone marrow donor match! (10/10 is really good!)
Thank you to everyone who has run a bone marrow drive or sent a note of support. You guys rock.
Here’s a note from Amit below.
superamit:

Many of you have asked, so here’s what’s going on with me.
WHAT HAPPENED BEFORE
8/1979: Born. Grew up in CT, built a killer eraser collection, fell in love with computers.
Left college to start a company. Fell hard. Fled to India for 3 months.
Started 2nd company. Learned to be an adult. Fell in love with NYC.
Moved to SF, discovered burritos & some of my fave people on Earth.
9/2011: Got diagnosed with Leukemia!
Cried. Went through 3 cycles of chemo. Hurt. Thought hard about what I want out of life. Grew up a second time.
TODAY
… After over 100 drives organized by friends, family, and strangers, celebrity call-outs, a bazillion reblogs (7000+!), tweets, and Facebook posts, press, fundraising and international drives organized by tireless friends, and a couple painful false starts, I’ve got a 10/10 matched donor!
You all literally helped save my life. (And the lives of many others.)
WHAT HAPPENS NEXT
Tomorrow, I’ll be admitted to Dana Farber in Boston for 4-5 weeks.
First I’ll get a second Hickman line to allow direct access to my heart (for meds and for nutrients if I’m not able to eat). Over the next week, the docs blast my body with a stiff chemo cocktail to try and eradicate all traces of cancer cells. In the process, the immune system I was born with, and my body’s ability to make blood, are destroyed.
Next Friday, I get my donor’s stem cells by IV. I start on immunosuppressants to prevent my body from rejecting them (I’ll be on them for 12-18 months). For these weeks I’ve no immune system, so I’m severely vulnerable to viruses and bacteria. My hospital room and hallway become my world.
Meanwhile, the stem cells make their way to my bone marrow and, with some luck, start producing platelets, red blood cells, and white blood cells. At this point, my blood type changes to the blood type of my donor. And my blood will now have my donor’s DNA, not my own.
This is science fiction stuff. I can hardly believe it’s even possible, and there’s lots of chances for things to go wrong. It’s frightening.
AFTER THE TRANSPLANT
Recovery to a new state of “normal” takes about a year, but there’s a few storm clouds hovering:
My immune system is new, like a baby’s. I’m prone to getting sick.
Just as with any organ transplant, there’s a chance of rejection. Except in this case, it’s my blood that’s the foreign body, and it touches every organ. They call it graft-vs-host-disease and it can cause health issues and organ complications for the rest of my life.
Successful transplant or not, Leukemia can relapse. Stubborn mofo.
Overall, 75% of AML transplant patients survive year one, 50% make it through year five. My odds are a little better since I’m young.
THE GREAT NEWS
I’ve got a long road ahead. But I’ve got a donor & amazing family & friends. A few months ago I didn’t have many options. Today I have a plan.
I am alive. I start tomorrow. Wish me luck!
Thank you.

photojojo:

Photojojo founder, Amit, has found a 10/10 bone marrow donor match! (10/10 is really good!)

Thank you to everyone who has run a bone marrow drive or sent a note of support. You guys rock.

Here’s a note from Amit below.

superamit:

Many of you have asked, so here’s what’s going on with me.

WHAT HAPPENED BEFORE

  • 8/1979: Born. Grew up in CT, built a killer eraser collection, fell in love with computers.
  • Left college to start a company. Fell hard. Fled to India for 3 months.
  • Started 2nd company. Learned to be an adult. Fell in love with NYC.
  • Moved to SF, discovered burritos & some of my fave people on Earth.
  • 9/2011: Got diagnosed with Leukemia!
  • Cried. Went through 3 cycles of chemo. Hurt. Thought hard about what I want out of life. Grew up a second time.

TODAY

… After over 100 drives organized by friends, family, and strangers, celebrity call-outs, a bazillion reblogs (7000+!), tweets, and Facebook posts, press, fundraising and international drives organized by tireless friends, and a couple painful false starts, I’ve got a 10/10 matched donor!

You all literally helped save my life. (And the lives of many others.)

WHAT HAPPENS NEXT

Tomorrow, I’ll be admitted to Dana Farber in Boston for 4-5 weeks.

First I’ll get a second Hickman line to allow direct access to my heart (for meds and for nutrients if I’m not able to eat). Over the next week, the docs blast my body with a stiff chemo cocktail to try and eradicate all traces of cancer cells. In the process, the immune system I was born with, and my body’s ability to make blood, are destroyed.

Next Friday, I get my donor’s stem cells by IV. I start on immunosuppressants to prevent my body from rejecting them (I’ll be on them for 12-18 months). For these weeks I’ve no immune system, so I’m severely vulnerable to viruses and bacteria. My hospital room and hallway become my world.

Meanwhile, the stem cells make their way to my bone marrow and, with some luck, start producing platelets, red blood cells, and white blood cells. At this point, my blood type changes to the blood type of my donor. And my blood will now have my donor’s DNA, not my own.

This is science fiction stuff. I can hardly believe it’s even possible, and there’s lots of chances for things to go wrong. It’s frightening.

AFTER THE TRANSPLANT

Recovery to a new state of “normal” takes about a year, but there’s a few storm clouds hovering:

  • My immune system is new, like a baby’s. I’m prone to getting sick.
  • Just as with any organ transplant, there’s a chance of rejection. Except in this case, it’s my blood that’s the foreign body, and it touches every organ. They call it graft-vs-host-disease and it can cause health issues and organ complications for the rest of my life.
  • Successful transplant or not, Leukemia can relapse. Stubborn mofo.

Overall, 75% of AML transplant patients survive year one, 50% make it through year five. My odds are a little better since I’m young.

THE GREAT NEWS

I’ve got a long road ahead. But I’ve got a donor & amazing family & friends. A few months ago I didn’t have many options. Today I have a plan.

I am alive. I start tomorrow. Wish me luck!

Thank you.

May 27

collegehumor:

10 Common Misconceptions Debunked

I’m going to have to spread a lot more misconceptions to make up for this. First off, human fetuses can grow to maturity in watermelons.

May 27

Yelping with Cormac: T. G. I. Friday's →

yelpingwithcormac:

Fresno, CA

Cormac M. | Author | Lost in the chaparral, NM

Two stars.

Watts strode into the restaurant smelling of horse and woodsmoke and all the patrons turned to watch him as if he had called out to them but he had made no sound save the whispering of his leathers and the jangle of his spurs….